Author information

Submitting manuscripts

Only original, unpublished manuscripts will be considered for publication. By submitting a manuscript, the authors attest that the article is not currently under review or published elsewhere (including journals, newspapers, blogs or web sites).

Manuscripts should be drafted directly on EP templates and submitted by email to epjournaleditors@gmail.com. If you are interested in writing a book review, please contact Book Review Editor Catherine Salmon.

For all submissions (other than book reviews), include an abstract with a maximum of 200 words that appears after the title page, but before the main text. Immediately following the abstract, please provide up to 5 key words.

Although one of the virtues of an on-line journal is that we are not subject to the same page limitations as print journals, we must be sensitive to our readers’ time and patience. Hence, contributors are strongly urged to be concise, using no more words or pages than necessary.

Manuscripts should be submitted using Microsoft Word templates. See below for additional information.

If authors whose books are reviewed wish to respond, we invite them to contact the Editor with a link to their response. This link will be posted in the review in question. Please note that in such cases, the author and not Evolutionary Psychology is responsible for the material.

Author Guidelines

To decrease the delay between submission and publication of accepted manuscripts, we are asking authors to use templates ( EP original article template and EP book review template) for creating their manuscripts for submission. The template files are downloadable .doc files that have fields for author modification. Use of these templates will make post-proof processing of manuscripts significantly faster, producing noticeable decreases in time between submission of final proof-edited manuscript and publication.

For example, an author submitting an original article should download the EP original article template, insert into this file the manuscript text (see example), figures, tables, references, etc., and save the file with a unique identifying name (e.g., thomson_EP_final.doc).

If you have questions about our templates or using the template files please contact the Production Manager.

Specific points 

Footnotes 

Quotations 

Textual references 

Examples of some common textual references 

Page numbers 

Preparation of bibliography 

Presentation of bibliography 

Abbreviated journal titles 

Individual entries

Artwork, figures, and tables

Statement of ethical treatment of participants

Specific points 

Spacing: Always double space – whether text, displayed quotations, endnotes, footnotes, references, or bibliography.

Font: Main body text should be 12 point, Times New Roman font.

Spellings: where both -ise and -ize endings are possible, please use the latter, thus: realize, equalize.

Italics: Use them sparingly for emphasis; consider rewriting the sentence, since italics may read as shrill.

Do use italics for: book, film and play titles; works of art; long poems which are virtually books in themselves; names of periodicals.

Use US, not UK or Australian spelling: favorite, not favourite; behavior, not behaviour.

Do not use the ampersand (&) in the text or bibliography, even for joint authors; use the ampersand only in the case of a company name.

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Footnotes 

Footnotes should be used rather than endnotes. Authors should try to avoid footnotes whenever possible however, as they may disrupt the flow of the text. Some people do not find this easy. Here are a few hints. Insert brief references in the text. Revise text to include ‘asides’. Cut out parenthetical allusions altogether.  If footnotes are used, number with superscript arabic numerals.

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Quotations 

Avoid use of single quotation marks. Use double quotation marks for internal quotations. In the rare case of a quotation internal to that, revert to single quotes. For quotations longer than about 60 words (or five lines), indent without quotation marks.

For material in quotation marks, the norm is that it is exempt from alterations of wording. However, for consistency, the MS will be copy-edited to the house style – so you may wish to keep this in mind when preparing your MS. Ambiguities, such as archaic or misleading punctuation, should also be corrected by you as long as the original meaning is not distorted.

Wherever you are making an authorial comment within a quotation, it should be in square brackets, [ ].

Following a displayed quotation, the next line of type should be full out.

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Textual references 

The system we use is to enclose references within parentheses, thus: (Jones, 1976, p. 56). Don’t use ibid. or op. cit. when the context makes it clear that you are still quoting the same work: just use (p. 56). Although you do not have to give a page number for every single remark, you should always cite a page number for displayed material – it stands out so much more clearly and is usually there for emphasis anyway. If two authors have the same surname, give initial of first name too: (Freud, A., p. 33).

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Examples of some common textual references 

(Darwin, 1859)

(Darwin, 1859, pp. 17-18)

(Darwin, 1859, 1927, 1928)

(Darwin, 1859; Huxley, 1926) [Note references in alphabetical order, not date order.]

(Gould, personal communication, 1977)

(quoted in Hamilton, p. 55)

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Page numbers 

Please list page numbers in full, as in: pp. 201-202.

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Preparation of bibliography 

The textual reference, by author’s name, leads the reader to the right place in the author-date bibliography. When there are several works by the same author, they appear in date order. Works by sole author precede works by the same author but authored jointly with another or others, regardless of date order, thus:

Laplanche, J. (1971)

Laplanche, J.  (1975)

Laplanche, J. and Pontalis, J.B. (1973)

You should always supply the publisher location and name for books.

A personal communication should not appear in a bibliography, for it cannot be traced. It should just be named as such in the text, with a date.

Inclusive pagination – again in the shortest intelligible form – is required for all references, whether to journal articles, chapters in books, or references to a work in a Collected Works.

Issue numbers should not be included in the bibliography.

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Presentation of bibliography 

It is your responsibility to establish whether you are citing an article, chapter, book, or other source and to cite it in the appropriate way. Please note capitalization of article and book titles: capitalize only the first word of the title, and the first word following a colon. Proper nouns should also be capitalized. See below for examples.

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Abbreviated journal titles 

Please do not use abbreviated titles.

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Individual entries 

Book

Darwin, C. (1859). On the origin of species by means of natural selection. London: John Murray.

Edited book

Dukas, R. (Ed.). (1998). Cognitive ecology: The evolutionary ecology of information processing and decision making. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Article in book

Pinker, S., and Bloom, P. (1992). Natural language and natural selection. In J. H. Barkow,  L. Cosmides, and J. Tooby (Eds.), The adapted mind: Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture (pp. 451-493). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Article in journal

Paulesu, E., McCrory, E., Fazio, F., Menoncello, L., Brunswick, N., Cappa, S. F., . . . Frith, U. (2000). A cultural effect on brain function. Nature Neuroscience3, 91-96.

Thesis or dissertation

O’Connell, S. (1995). Theory of mind in chimpanzees. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Liverpool, Liverpool.

Conference presentation

Murphy, D., and Stich, S. P. (1998). Darwin in the madhouse. Paper presented at the Evolving the Human Mind Conference organized by the Hang Seng Centre for Cognitive Studies, University of Sheffield, 24-27 June 1998.

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Artwork, figures, and tables 

Artwork, including figures, tables, models, etc. should be embedded in author’s submitted manuscript files where referenced in the text. Authors should not append figures, tables, etc. to the end of their manuscripts. In order to maintain optimum appearance and readability of artwork, upon acceptance of a manuscript for publication an author may be asked to submit high-quality/high-resolution versions of their artwork (e.g., TIFF or JPG format). This reduces quality loss upon shrinking the artwork for publication. Tables can be submitted as part of a RTF or Microsoft Word file and should conform to APA format.

An advantage of Evolutionary Psychology’s online format is the ability to offer authors more choice regarding the use of pictures or figures, at no cost. The editors encourage authors submitting articles to include color pictures or figures when appropriate. Authors are expected to obtain permission from copyright holders, if applicable.

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Statement of ethical treatment of participants

Authors should provide a statement in their method/materials section indicating that the study was approved by either a Committee on Research Ethics (CORE), an Institutional Review Board (IRB), or an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) (e.g., this study was approved by the institutional review board at Georgia Gwinnett College). If authors feel it compromises confidentiality of participants to reveal the identity of that committee in the methods section then they should indicate that the research was approved by the appropriate committee on research ethics in the methods section and only reveal the identity of that committee in the cover letter.

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Evolutionary Psychology - An open access peer-reviewed journal - ISSN 1474-7049 © Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young; individual articles © the author(s)
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