Original article:

Facial cues to perceived height influence leadership choices in simulated war and peace contexts

Evolutionary Psychology 11(1): 89-103 Daniel E. Re, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom., dr296@st-andrews.ac.ukLisa M. DeBruine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.Benedict C. Jones, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.David I. Perrett, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Body size and other signs of physical prowess are associated with leadership hierarchies in many social species. Here we (1) assess whether facial cues associated with perceived height and masculinity have different effects on leadership judgments in simulated wartime and peacetime contexts and (2) test how facial cues associated with perceived height and masculinity influence dominance perceptions. Results indicate that cues associated with perceived height and masculinity in potential leaders‟ faces are valued more in a wartime (vs. peacetime) context. Furthermore, increasing cues of apparent height and masculinity in faces increased perceived dominance. Together, these findings suggest that facial cues of physical stature contribute to establishing leadership hierarchies in humans.

Keywords

masculinity, dominance, intergroup conflict, body size, face morphology

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Evolutionary Psychology - An open access peer-reviewed journal - ISSN 1474-7049 © Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young; individual articles © the author(s)
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